Christmas Dangers…

Christmas Dangers…

Christmas is a time of joy for many… full of time spent with family, parties (possibly not so much this year!), decorations and presents. It’s easy to get caught up in the holiday swirl without remembering that our feline companions may not find Christmas such a fun time!

When celebrating this year keep these hazards in mind and make the appropriate changes around the house.

Our first Christmas hazard isn’t something that many might consider a hazard but our cats certainly do!

1. Changes in routine!
Cats are creatures of habit, they like everything in their environment to stay the same – putting up decorations, having visitors over and keeping irregular hours can be quite stressful to cats, so ensure that they have plenty of resources and places to hide away, as well as using calming pheromone diffusers.
Escapees!! Dark nights and unusual comings and goings are a bad combination. It can unsettle and frighten cats. If they do escape, the risk of road accidents are higher for cats unused to being outside and also the dark nights can make them more vulnerable. Ensure house cats are secure whenever outside doors are open and as above, all cats have a safe place to go if they’re feeling anxious.

2. Toxins
Antifreeze – Spills and leaks of water coolants from cars can cause kidney failure and death if ingested. To avoid accidental spillages store in robust, sealed containers and ensure they are clearly labelled. Clean up spills immediately, no matter how small. Always dispose of antifreeze responsibly.
Signs of poisoning include vomiting, lethargy, uncoordinated movements, seizures and difficulty breathing. Contact your vet immediately if you suspect your cat could have been poisoned…

3. Shiny things
Tinsel, Ornaments, Fairy lights, Snow globes (filled with antifreeze).

4. Hot things
Candles, oil burners, open fire.

5. Edibles
Chocolate, alcohol, bones/leftovers, raisins.

6. Plants
Christmas foliage and plants eg. lilies, poinsettia etc.

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Clients Of The Clinic:

In the event of an out of hours emergency please contact the surgery on 0191 385 9696 and listen to the voice message to obtain the on call phone number.

In An Emergency:

In an emergency please try to phone the clinic ahead of your arrival if at all possible, this will enable staff to be ready to attend to your cat immediately!

Phone:       0191 385 9696

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Address:    Simply Cats Vet Clinic
                     12 Front Street,  Fencehouses
                       Durham  DH4 6LP  UK

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